Saturday, August 9, 2014

San Francisco Trip: La Conner to Neah Bay

Day One - We head out from the American Tug factory to Neah Bay - 92 Miles

The opportunity to take an American Tug down the Pacific Coast to San Francisco was too great to pass up.  I love cruising in the ocean.  Good friends and a well built boat should be fun.

La Conner at first light - Mt. Baker in the background


4:58 AM - We untied the lines and slipped off the dock at Trawler Row.  Looking at the the tide guide doing thorough research and trip plannng while sitting in the La Conner Tavern last night, we decided to head out at first light to catch a large 11-foot ebbing tide that would help us move west in the Straits of Juan de Fuca.

Deception Pass Bridge at Sunrise


We hit 16.8 knots with the current push.

6:20 AM - Passed under the Deception Pass Bridge...fast.  The current was nearly at max ebb when we arrived at Deception Pass.  Clear blue skies and no wind.  The water was boiling a bit.  We kicked up the throttle to 1800-rpm and gave the boat good steerage.  10-knots of boat speed plus the current and we hit 16.8-knots.  Fun!


Sea state was very nice in the Straits.  

10:00 AM - The strong ebb tide gave way to the flood as we neared Port Angeles.  The slight westerly wind and flood tide flattened the water.  Everything is running smooth, happy boat & happy crew.

Makah Marina in Neah Bay, WA

4:45 PM - We tied up at the Makah Marina at Neah Bay.  This is the northwest tip of the Continental USA.  Neah Bay is a busy fishing port during the season.  Day one was fun on the water.

The weather pattern looks very nice for the next several days with a high sitting over the northern coast covering Oregon and Washington.  We plan to hop down the coast moving during the daylight hours; getting out at first light with visibility to avoid the commercial crab traps that dot the coastline.  Get off the water in the afternoon before the onshore breeze builds, drawn in by the heating landform.  I love travelling the coast, the towns and people are interesting. 

Stay tuned...more to follow!    Steve